Skip to main content

About your Search

20130125
20130125
STATION
CNBC 5
FBC 4
KQED (PBS) 2
KICU 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
MSNBC 1
MSNBCW 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the consumer is in a worse spot primarily because of tax hikes. supply side economics, right. so apple is a consumer company for the most part and i think that any consumer company will struggle. >> that's an important point. let's follow that point. is part of this apple drop weakness in consumer spending or expected weakness, or is it, in fact, the competition from samsung and the fact that the company is not executing. in other words is it a company story, an economics story, what is it? >> there's a lot of company specific stuff going on just comparables this quarter versus a year ago. that's part of it. it's a maturing company to a degree. it's going through its growth phase. now getting into the phase which hopefully will last a long time you focus on return on invested capital. that could be fine. the market has to adjust to that perception. i think the consumer point is a good one. is the consumer going retrench with higher taxes and we see the jobless claims out the last few weeks -- >> coming down. >> they are looking great. >> is it seasonal or real. we won't know that for a
do we mean just raising taxes? isn't most of the austerity in europe raising taxes? >> no. >> not in greece? >> it would actually be starting to collect taxes. >> we raise taxes, which have to do with the middle class -- >> that's the austerity you're talking about, raising taxes? >> yes. >> and also the cutting of wages. we have a dramatic cut in wages, not only in the public sector, but also in the private sector. because the economy, the basis itself on small and medium enterprises, which mainly produce for the domestic market, this has been a distraction. we have lost a lot of jobs, a lot of company, the private sector in a very bad state, in a country which was growing with a rate of more than 4%. but this double -- >> so much more than you were taking in at that point. there's a deficit that has to be paid off. and the measures you're talking about, technology and organizing the economy could take a long time to kick in. >> this is correct. but the main problem in greece was always state revenues. because they do not tax the rates. they allow tax evasion for the weal
the money that you need toward all of this. and i'd like to get your take on the tax structure that is most favorable to getting people to be as generous as they can. what could you tell our viewers in terms of what government policy may be able to do to actually encourage more giving and how it can hurt? >> well, the tax deductibility of charitable giving certainly has been a positive factor in why the u.s. is the most generous. people give about 2% of their incomes and that's true it's not disproportionately the richest. across the board americans are quite generous. the estate tax which lets your charitable giving not be taxed is clearly a very positive encouragement to look at giving. i'd say that even more than the taxes, though, the fact that there's more examples of people where -- so everyone is asking themselves, you know, could i be giving you something, the fact that they hear the impact is very strong, i think the kind of social movement is even more, but the tax structure helps. >> what continuing investment is needed at this point? in other words who are the biggest stakeholde
in washington? the higher payroll taxes, and the general sense that the economy's not getting any better. is it? the answer's simple. why you may not think the overall economy is getting better, you're missing the big picture, partner. if you were to ask me to game the market using just one figure, one figure only, it wouldn't be what apple earns, the gross domestic product, the growth rate of earnings or the dividend yield of the s&p, it would be the weekly jobless claims. the weekly jobless claims is an indicator of future employment in this country. there's absolutely no coincidence that we had five-year highs today in the stock market. at the same time that unemployment claims hit five-year lows. it isn't fanciful that the market's roaring because jobs are being created at an accelerating pace. it's the most important determinant of the stock market. after all, the market got crushed when unemployment went above 5.5% and soared right into the great recession. i think these positive jobless numbers are occurring because of the certainty that comes from putting a presidential election and a t
. letting start-ups, tax reform, and regulatory reform help. that's what we need more. >> you really think we need more? >> i mean, you want to make fun of -- >> i don't ever make fun of playing. i like my politicians who play. and who have cameras around when they do. what did you learn today, sam? >> you picked your clothes by number. i have no idea. the sweater collection could probably use an upgrade. >> this is number 47 right here, by the way. >> this is the hollywood business sweater, right? >> that's right! >> i learned about super fierce sri lankan women fighter, and victor garber is wonderful, and my neighbor. which is great. >> if it's way too early, harold, what time is it? >> it's time for "morning joe". >> but coming up next -- >> is my man, chuck todd on "the daily rundown". >> no, luke. >> luke russert! >>> taking it to the streets, vice president biden heads into virginia to make the case for new gun law. can a campaign-style push pressure congress to get something done. forewarned on the bayou. louisiana governor bobby jindal has tough talk for his party about what's wron
seems to want to continue to plow higher. >> absolutely. we have some tax clarity. we have some debt ceiling clarity. you give the market clarity, and improving economic numbers and decent earnings season hard for us not to rally higher. you know, we're closing over 1500. we closed over 1500 under monday. i think that is really bullish for the next couple of weeks at least through friday's employment numbers. i want to point out something really interesting that is happening. the jcj the correlation index. little in the weeds here. but what it really measures how stocks are correlating to the s&p 500. when stocks are correlating a lot, that's bearish stocks and it makes stock picking very, very difficult because really you're picking stocks, a slave to the overall market. that index is now at precrisis lows. so stock pick something now something we can do. something we haven't been able to do for a long period of time. so what are we seeing this first quarter? stocks are moving but the indexes are not. so you're being rewarded for being a good stock-picker and being penalized, apple,
calls balance and what the republicans call nonsense because it involves raising taxes. i think you have to do bovment i think you have to have more revenue and you have to cut back spending. >> susie: let's say congress doesn't do that. what happens next? explain to people what happens next. >> i think the real risk is that we come to a showdown in march when the current stopgap budget ends and we face the government shutdown. people will lose svices. pele wl lose jobs. and there will be a fiscal contraction, on top of the ones that we've already put in place. and that's not great for the economy, for sure. >> you know, and this whole conversation about a budget and the deficit and all of that. it's all about raising taxes and cutting spending. and there's no discuss about growth. and that is what americans really want. growth and jobs. what do we have to do to get growth? >> well, the badh6+suz there, susie s that while higher growth is by far the best remedy, it's very hard to put if into effect. in a sizableay. you need more investnt i human beings, that's education and so on. you ne
. you see. charles: i made it on time. stuart: don peebles is a nice guy. he does not want higher tax rates. he wants lower tax rates. charles: he does have a conservative look. it goes against all of your core principles to back president obama. stuart: by the way, thank you liz. now it is time to give it to connell. connell: you did look like you are getting along very, very well. i am connell mcshane. has housing finally turned a corner? that will be our big debate and discussion this morning. jamie dimon says, yes, it is going back up. >> it will not get better in spite of the economy. supply and demand. for household formation. connell: wait a minute, a drop in sales came in. we will sort all this out coming up. and flipping houses and fixing them up. vanilla ice, of all people, is with us during this hour. republicans need to get tougher and cut federal programs. 58% of americans oppose anything happening. we are going to start with the stock market. we have been talking about this. we are up again today with nicole petallides covering it from the new york stock exchange. nicole
about. the obama administration has sort of taken this tactic in the past, during the payroll tax cut fight, during the student loan fight, really circumventing congress and trying to build a ground swell of support among the people, to pressure congress to get what it wants to get done passed. so in this case, that is the stiffer gun law. so you're going to see vice president biden out today, holding that roundtable, talking about gun legislation. he'll be joined by his cabinet secretaries as well as a democratic senator, tim kaine, to really try to talk to the people about why he thinks this for gun legislation is a good idea. but, of course, as you just mapped out, there is a lot of opposition to this, particularly in states like virginia. so they're hoping to get moderates on their side, so that when this really does go to a fight, they will have the votes in the end. senior administration officials tell me, privately, they think that there is a lot of support for universal background checks and for limiting high-capacity magazines, but, of course, that ban on assault weapons is r
in part to the capital gains tax increase that would take effect in 2013 for those making $400,000 or more. mulville also mentioned how the changing demographics of americans go hand-in-hand with the world- wide interest in american real estate. "americans are getting older, becoming more willing sellers at the same time as foreigners want to come in and buy, so it's a combination of things that's magnifying the demand in the upper end. financing is readily available as banks are on track to distribute more private jumbo loans than they have since 2007. > > with this rush of buyers to own these million dollar homes, is this a sign the economy turning around? experts say yes, but not so fast. "we might see some stimulus effect, but i don't think it will be a major decider if we pull out of the recession or not." for first business news, i'm ky sisson. recent data shows that luxury housing markets in south florida, denver, and phoenix are also making a comeback. still ahead, watch your wings. why chicken wing prices are soaring for the superbowl this year. our traders unplugged have a bone t
and evening hours. >> your kron 4 7 day around the bay forecast shows and our tax system with not much marcher imoisture. --and our tax systartic system. >> more on the forecast coming up in a moment. >> the approach to the bay bridge toll plaza looking good. and my weight and some of the caste lines in our last report not the case anymore. still have overnight road work in effect for the incline section but not producing in delays. >> at the cemetery ridge traffic building not only in the west bound direction towards of to see you consider lights several of them hedy's down to hayward. the drive 12 best 30 minutes between 8 80/1 zero one. >> the code a bridge, southbound 11 looks good however,--the golden gate bridge south bound 101 looks good. >> we do have dense fog and portions of the north bay. >> traffic maps show more about 101 looks good no issues for interstate 280. >> you may encounter damp roadways. drive with extra caution. 23 minutes out of navao into san francisco. >> no delays on public transit for ac transit, bart our couch at this hour. >> thank you erica on to the situation i
. they've got plenty of room to make a good margin and pay this tax to microsoft for the operating system. i'm not so concerned about apple as much as just the whole market getting commoditized. on the consumer side, i think that's a tough market for microsoft. if you don't need office, you really don't need to pay a premium for your products. they can afford to cut price on their hardware. microsoft's hair wear shipments are material on the market. they're there to show good design. it's important that their partners -- >> you could say they're out of touch. you mentioned office. i see now there's a suggestion that actually when the new office suite comes out, it will be licensed. you will pay a monthly subscription in order to have microsoft office. that doesn't seem to be where the bulk of the market is at the moment. that's not what consumers are doing, generally in their lives, is it? >> actually, simon, 20% of office's consumer, you know, 80% is enterprise, and 60% of enterprises are on subscription already. so there is a pretty significant migration to subscription that's well alon
out of town. and interestingly, based on some spending cuts and tax increases that have been implemented so far, we're pretty close. and jack lew intimately knows what it takes to get from here to there. now, i think you, also, to, about other issues of the treasury's beat, international currency, financial markets, implementing the dodd-frank issue. as i mentioned, financial reform is still incomplete. so jack lew is going to have to oversee those as well. >> susie: let me get back to the budget issue. jack lew was also the architect of this sequester mechanism. a lot of people are worried if that kicks in, the automatic spending cuts, that, you know, that would really be a bad thing for the economy. some democrats are surprisingly saying maybe that's a good way to handle this whole budget cuts. where do you think jack lew stands on that? and, unfortunately, we just have half a minute left. what do you think? >> well, i think jack recognizes that if the sequester kicks in, it does two things. one, it makes deficit savings a lot more pronounced. that's $85 billion in one year
the reforms that matter, energy policy being a clear one with climate change attached. how we get tax reform in place to make americans and american corporations competitive again, globally. big thing for dow chemical. we want to reinvest in america because we can be competitive out of america. that agenda has to be put on the national agenda. i know the second term president is very keen on doing that. liz: the first term president was accused of being anti-business or not as friendly to business even though he brought a lot of business leaders to the white house and listened to them. many of them sat here and said you know what liz, though, he listened but i didn't see anything effectuated. do you think it's a different time now with president obama? >> i'm very fortunate that i was one of the ones that was called upon very early to help first term president obama. you've got to understand where he's coming from and his agenda and how he got voted in. liz: how hard is it to understand that businesses create jobs? >> not hard, but how hard is it to actually put the agenda ahead of the other
deal. he was targeted by the tea party because he was considering raising taxes. >>> they must provide sports for disable students much like title iv expanded opportunities for girl students, students with disabilities must be provided access to extracurricular sports. back to tracy and ashley. tracy: rick folbaum, thanks very much. honeywell beat the street with its latest quarterlyly report. sandra smith has the trade. >> halliburton getting a boost in today's session. when you think halliburton you think fracking. but they saw weakness in north america. that led to a drop of about 26% for their quarterly profit because they beat expectations. the stock is really off to the races today. by the way look at the shares just under 40 bucks. the average analyst has a overweight rating with a $43 billion price target. many see as a good buy at these levels even following that report. as far as manufacturing is concerned look at honeywell. look at this steady eddie chart. year-to-date the stock has been strong, nearly $70 a share. right now the average price target is 72 with an overweight
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)